Sleeping through the night

I’ve been sleeping all night long. That’s an amazing statement, actually (despite the current US economic worries). You see, I have sleep disturbances. Not apnea (although the sleep test I took did indicate occasional apnea, 8 episodes in 7 hours of sleep), buy hypopnea, or shallow breathing during sleep. At one point my oxygen saturation fell to 82% (normal is considered mostly anything above about 96%). I occasionally snore as well.

I now have a CPAP machine next to my bed, set at 11 centimeters (air pressure). The first couple of nights were very interesting, I’d wake every couple of hours (as usual) and adjust the mask, or scratch my nose, and have to put the machine back on the low pressure ramp up (ramps from 4 cm to 11 cm over 30 minutes), roll over and go back to sleep. Wednesday night was the first night that I can remember in a very long time that I essentially slept all night long. I think I woke up once around 2 AM to readjust the mask, then went right back to sleep.

I’ve had my machine for just under one week, and I have to tell you that I feel so much better: well rested and mentally alert. I can’t wait to see what happens over the next month!

If you have problems sleeping at night, I strongly recommend that you check in with your local Ear Nose and Throat Clinic and ask them for a sleep study to see if you have a problem with sleep disturbances. It just might change your life for the better!

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4 thoughts on “Sleeping through the night

  1. much the same story with me. i went for years with sleep apnea until my wife talked me into going to a sleep study. i was waking up gasping for air hundreds of time during the night. i went for years with out REM sleep or dreams. since i got my CPAP, i sleep through the night, wake up rested, and have lots of cool dreams.

  2. I also highly recommend the CPAP for those who don’t have apnea or breathing problems. DH used to regularly wake up shaking from the pounding heart-rapid breathing/gasping from lack of oxy to the heart and brain. It scares the heck out of the sleeping partner, who usually has the harder time going back to sleep. Good for you Mike!

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